Monday, May 25, 2020

Why Fruit Is Bad For The Soul - 1219 Words

Why Fruit is Bad for the Soul We tell stories to remember history, but these tales aren’t as static as the facts of history. Each time a story is told, it changes with the storyteller’s interpretation. Paintings are no exception. One of the most famous stories in mainstream Christianity is the story of Adam and Eve. The story of the mother and father of all humans disobeying God and eating from the forbidden tree of knowledge, and being punished for the misdeed, is passed down as a lesson about why people must obey God. There have been numerous artistic depictions of this story created throughout the ages, two of the most famous being created by Michelangelo and Cranach. Adam and Eve by Cranach and Adam and Eve by Michelangelo are both depictions of Adam and Even eating the forbidden fruit. Cranach demonstrates his viewpoint of the act as an unwitting sin using a path of blame from the serpent all the way to Adam and Eve as well as bold colors to emphasize vitality and pureness lost. Michelangelo, on the other hand, shows his belief that it was deliberate disobedience, demonstrated by the integration of snake and man as the source of temptation and a barren landscape to imply their lack of remorse. Ultimately, Cranach shows a reason to forgive, while Michelangelo justifies the punishment. The lines connecting Adam, Eve and the serpent as well as the distinction, or lack of, between them and the snake in Cranach’s and Michelangelo’s paintings shows where they place theShow MoreRelatedWhy One Sin Is Worse Than Another1629 Words   |  7 PagesMost Christians these days see every sin as equally bad. In other words, no one sin is worse or should draw worse punishment than another. In Dantes The Inferno, however, this is not the case. In The Inferno, the deeper one delves into Hell, the worse the sin that has been committed. The punishments that the souls incur are representative of the sins they committed in their corporeal state of being. Sins that affect others a re considered worse then those that only affect ones self by Dante. TheRead MoreHuman Nature, Origin, And Salvation1711 Words   |  7 Pagesteaches that all men have an inherent sinful nature. This nature is a result of the fall of Adam and Eve, the first created brings. God gave Adam and Eve every good thing he created to eat for their sustenance. They were forbidden only from eating the fruit of the tree of knowledge, but God also gave them moral responsibility and choice. They chose to disobey God, so God’s perfect creation become tainted with the stain of sin, resulting in humans to be separated from the close relationship with God thatRead More Phaedo Summary Essay786 Words   |  4 Pagesbe happy, and when that death comes; he will have achieved the best gift in the world. nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;Socrates states evidence of why he is not afraid of dying through multiple mini-conclusions. Socrates says to Simmias, â€Å"Why when his time comes should he repine at which he has always been pursuing and desiring?† Socrates is saying why should philosophers grieve at death when that should be the goal of their whole lives. He believes only philosophers can understand because he believesRead MoreSpeech On Good Seed Is Wasted760 Words   |  4 Pages Good seed is wasted when planted in the midst of weeds, and good thoughts are wasted in a consciousness of need, or greed. This is why it is so important to prepare the soil (soul), before sowing the seed (of thought). Yet, amazingly, when people get no results from their prayers, they pray all the more! When desperate, even the devout ignore what Jesus taught about prayer: â€Å"But when ye pray, use not vain repetitions, as the heathen [do]: for they think that they shall be heard for their muchRe ad MoreJohn Augustine s Life And Life1266 Words   |  6 Pagesuses his past sins and later confesses to God that will eventually enhance his soul and body. The consequences of this appropriation are that sins are considered to be ‘pleasurable.’ Saint Augustine’s all truth is God who speaks through the Bible. All throughout his younger years, he admits that had done a lot of sins. But the one thing he kept on repeating was the sin about the pear tree. Many people might wonder why Augustine makes such a major ordeal about it, yet this act denotes an importantRead MoreAugustine s Confessions : A Diverse Mix Of Autobiography, Philosophy, And Interpretation Of The Christian Bible1304 Words   |  6 Pageslater confesses to God. This will eventually enhance his mind and soul. The consequences of this appropriation are that sins can be ‘pleasurable’ which will tremendously effect Augustine’s life. Saint Augustine’s all truth is God who speaks through the Bible. All throughout his younger years, he admits that he had done a lot of sins. But the one thing he kept on repeating was the sin about the pear tree. Many people might wonder why Augustine makes such a major ordeal about it, yet this act denotesRead MoreDesire : Nature s Forbidden Fruit Essay1749 Words   |  7 PagesDesire: Nature’s Forbidden Fruit Desire is a powerful force that shapes the choices and actions people make every day. It is a concept that humanity is infatuated with, a puzzle to be deciphered on whether it is a truly good force or something that will only lead to a person’s own self destruction. Both the Bhagavad-Gita and Genesis, cornerstones of literature with their fascinating views of humanity, warn that the path down desire is a crooked one that will only lead to misery. The shrewd wisdomRead MoreA comparison of Augustinian Theodicy and Irenaean Theodicy1499 Words   |  6 Pagesperfected humanity through life in a highly imperfect world. Then a question Why cant God just create us as perfect as in Augustinian theodicy? is raised. To this question, John Hick gave a fully and vivid explanation in his book Philosophy of Religion. He cleverly points out: if the world were a paradise from which all possibility of pain and suffering were excluded, then the consequences would be very far-reaching, nothing bad, nothing suffering would exist in this world, no one could ever be injuredRead MoreIs A Good News?1565 Words   |  7 Pagesdoesn’t bear good fruit is going to be chopped down and thrown into the fire!† (my interpretation.) So how did the crowds respond? Did they run in the other direction saying, â€Å"Stay away from that guy. He’s bad news. He’s crazy! Run as fast as you can†? No, they did not run from his message. In fact, they did the opposite. Most people felt themselves drawn into the challenge and wanted to respond. â€Å"What should we do?† they asked. â€Å"What does God consider to be good fruit?† John the BaptistRead MoreSaint Augustine s Confessions : A Diverse Mix Of Autobiography, Philosophy, And Interpretation Of The Christian Bible1340 Words   |  6 Pageslater confesses to God. This will eventually enhance his mind and soul. The consequences of this appropriation are that sins can be ‘pleasurable’ which will tremendously affect Augustine’s life. Saint Augustine’s all truth is God who speaks through the Bible. All throughout his younger years, he admits that he had done a lot of sins. But the one thing he kept on repeating was the sin about the pear tree. Many people might wonder why Augustine makes such a major ordeal about it, yet this act denotes

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Nursing Theory Compare/Contrast Two Theories - 2283 Words

Nursing Theory: Compare/contrast two theories Name University Professor Course Date Nursing Theory: Compare/contrast two theoriesIntroduction Theory has so far remained a strategic tool in advanced nursing practice. Firstly, nursing utilizes every feature of management science. Fortunately, the knowledge base of each and every management science takes theory into account. Theory includes methods, principles, and concepts. The principles are usually related, and can be observed and validated or verified when translated into the practice of management. Likewise, concepts are general notions, thoughts, and ideas that tend to form a basis of discussion or action. Therefore, theoretical principles guide clinical nurses to various†¦show more content†¦In essence, the role played by the nurse is to increase and facilitate the self-care abilities and level of the individual patient (Smith amp; Parker, 2015). As such, self-care is neither reflexive nor instinctive. Instead, it is either performed rationally or intentionally in response to an already known need. Based on this Orems theory, rational response is learned th rough communication and interpersonal relations. Orem asserts that self-care agency can also be defined as the power to take action (Caruso, Cisar amp; Pipe, 2008). It is a complex capability developed to enable maturing adolescents and adults to recognize, identify, and understand various factors to be managed or controlled so as to decide about, develop, and perform realistic care measures. The capability discussed above is strongly dependent on culture-related values and lifelong experiences. In a nutshell, Orem uses her Self-Care Theory to view health as a state composed of developed mental and bodily functioning and human structures. This is because it includes psychological, social, physical, and interpersonal aspects (Caruso, Cisar amp; Pipe, 2008). Basically, major assumptions of Orems self-care theory include the fact that people should be responsible and self-reliant in relation to their own care and that of others, especially family members. Orem argued thatShow MoreRelatedCare Theory Compare Contrast1602 Words   |  7 PagesCare Theory Compare and Contrast Paper Pamela Morales HCS 350 July 11, 2011 Care Theory Compare and Contrast Paper Jean Watson’s Theory of human caring is based on transpersonal relationships and developing a caring environment that offers the development potential while allowing the person to choose the best course of action. Through interactions with others we learn how to recognize ourselves in others. Watson believes that through these interactions humanity is preserved. John Paley’s articleRead MoreTheory Analysis Essay712 Words   |  3 PagesNotes The ultimate goal of theory evaluation is to determine the potential of the theory to scientific knowledge. Hardy †¢ Theory evaluation: o meaningful and logical adequacy o Operational and empirical adequacy o Testability o Generality o Contribution to understanding o Predictability o Pragmatic adequacy Logical adequacy (diagramming) - identifying all theoretical terms (concepts, constructs, operational definitions, referents). Theory is a set of interrelated concepts and statements Read MoreCompare And Contrast Leininger And Kubler Ross1575 Words   |  7 Pages Leininger and Kà ¼bler-Ross Theories exist to guide and teach individuals about how and why certain disciplines function. One discipline that has many theories is nursing. Nursing theories help to guide patient care. For instance, Madeleine Leininger developed the theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality also known as transcultural nursing (TCN), which helps nurses to be culturally competent. There are also non-nursing theorists which can add to a nurse’s knowledge in caring for their patientRead MoreAnalyzing The Attributes Of Different Methods Equips The Researcher1119 Words   |  5 Pagesanalyzing the attributes of different methods equips the researcher to select an appropriate approach to satisfy the aim of their inquiry. Rodgers (2005) and Risjord (2010) present two approaches to nursing knowledge development. This paper will compare and contrast Rodgers â€Å"problem-solving†(p. 177) method with Risjord’s â€Å"nursing standpoint† (p. 36). Rodgers provides a method that uses knowledge deficits in practice as the foundation for research. Risjord, on the other hand, acknowledges nurses’ livesRead MoreThe Theories Of Sister Callista Roy s Adaptation Theory And Virginia Henderson1729 Words   |  7 Pages The purpose of this paper is to explore the theories of Sister Callista Roy and Virginia Henderson. Sister Callista Roy’s Adaptation Theory and Virginia Henderson’s Need Theory both play an important role in nursing today. Both theorists have written theories that can be used in a critical setting as well as multiple other practice areas. I will compare the similarities of each theory as well as contrast the differences. Both theories will be looked at and a plan will be developed to put themRead MoreThe Development Of Middle Range Theory1474 Words   |  6 Pagesstarted to incorporate nursing theories into their research and clinical practices. The most of the early theories fell into category of â€Å"grand theory †. While nursing researchers initially tried to utilize the grand theory in to their research, due to its wide range of information it made the effort difficult. The development of middle range theory started to emerge in attempt to incorporate in nursing research and practice. Middle range theory extend the understanding of nursing practice relevant toRead MoreTheoretical Framework in Nursing Process - Interaction Theories1655 Words   |  7 PagesTheoretical Framework for Nursing Practice – Module 6 A. Compare and contrast two of the models or theories presented in this chapter considering their usefulness in practice, research, education and administration. For the purposes of this discussion, I have selected King’s Theory of Goal Attainment and Peplau’s Theory of Interpersonal Relations. On a broad perspective, both theories aim at explaining the interaction processes that happen between a nurse and her patient. ImogeneRead MoreLeadership Skills Of Jean Watson And Michelle Obama1458 Words   |  6 Pagesabout the leadership philosophy of two female leaders Jean Watson and Michelle Obama, and how their leadership skills have impacted many lives. The purpose of this paper is to discuss what it means to be a leader, types, and characteristics of a leader, why it is important to have an effective leader, qualities, and behaviors that contribute to effective leadership, and compare and contrast between the different types of leadership styles and theories. A nursing theorist, Jean Watson, and MichelleRead MoreParse and Watson Theory: A Comparative Analysis1811 Words   |  7 PagesParse and Watson Theory: Compare and Contrast Introduction The objective of this study is to compare and contrast Parse and Watson theory. Rosemarie Rizzo Parse (1981) is reported to have set out to create a theory grounded in the human sciences that would enhance nursing knowledge. (Fawcett, 2001, p.26) According to Fawcett (2001) Parse stated that her idea to create such a theory began many years ago when she asked herself why not? According to Parse the theory surfaced in me in JamusianRead MoreGarnd and Middle Range Theories1080 Words   |  5 PagesMiddle Range Theories Meriam Izobo Oakland University Grand and Middle Range Theories When one thinks of the word theory the next thought should be nursing because the foundations of nursing are built from nursing theories. The history of nursing holds a significance to theory in that theories help establish nursing as a profession (Smith amp; Liehr, 2014). Theories from the past in the Nightingale era and new theories today in the 21st century aid in the guidance of nursing practice and

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Organizational Goals Of A Manager - 1622 Words

When thinking of management, many may think of their immediate supervisor, which may and can consist of a front line supervisor, store manager, or team leader, but regardless of their role and whether they are top, middle, or first line managers, they all have four essential concepts they must learn to master in order to be successful. â€Å"Managers are individuals in an organization who direct and oversee the activities of other people in the organization so organizational goals can be accomplished† (Robbins, DeCenzo, Coulter, 2015). In order for a manager to be able to do their job effectively and efficiently there are some concepts he or she will have to learn and implement. Planning and organization, being the first two concepts, will be†¦show more content†¦Strategic management develops an organizations plan for how they will do what it’s in business to do. â€Å"Strategic management is used to look at and plan the future† (Yakup, Zeynep Derya 20 16). The role of planner for a manager also comes with its challenges, in these cases he must remain calm and resorts to his strategic weapons: employee skills, innovation, social media and bench marking. A manager that can stay calm and in control under a time of uncertainty, are better capable of coming up with a better solution/plan. A manager can do this is by becoming open to ideas and allowing lower organizational levels to make plans this promotes innovation, a better work environment, improved manager-employee relationship, and loyalty to the company. Organizing â€Å"Organizing as the function of management that creates the organization’s structure† (Robbins, DeCenzo, Coulter, 2015). The organizations structure depends on the goal that the organization is trying to achieve. One of the many responsibilities management is faced with is the decision of having to alter or change an organizations structure and design for the improvement of the organization and having employees work more efficiently and effectively. There are six elements in organizational design that managers must know and keep in mind. The six elements are, workShow MoreRelatedThe Value Of An Effective Performance Evaluation Process1170 Words   |  5 Pagesan Effective Performance Evaluation Process Douglas Moyer Polk State College MAN-4301 Human Resource Management Matina Wagner November 29, 2015 â€Æ' The Value of an Effective Performance Evaluation Process One of the most misunderstood tools used by managers in today’s businesses is the performance evaluation. At its basic level, the performance evaluation is a tool that allows an organization to evaluate an employee’s past performance compared with a set of performance standards (Dessler, 2015). TheseRead MoreManagement and Leadership Paper1284 Words   |  6 Pagesthere are many differences that separate a manager from a leader. Bateman and Snell, 2008 stated that â€Å"Management is the process of working with people and resources, to accomplish organizational goal† (p19). Leadership is a manner in which a leader aspires to persuade his or her team to launch and achieve organizational goal. This paper will discuss the difference between management and leadership, the roles and responsibilities of leaders, and the managers in creating and maintaining a healthy cultureRead MoreOrganizational Design and Organizational Structure Essay1427 Words   |  6 PagesO RGANIZATIONAL DESIGN AND ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE An organization is a pattern of relationships-many interwoven, simultaneous relationships- through which people, under the direction of managers, pursue their common goals. These goals are the products of the decision - making processes. The goals that managers develop through planning are typically ambitious, far-reaching, and open-ended. Managers want to ensure that their organizations can endure for a long time. Members of an organizationRead MoreTypes of Control in an Organization1101 Words   |  5 PagesIN AN ORGANIZATION Learning Objectives †¢ Define organizational control, and describe the four steps of the control process. †¢ Identify the main output controls, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages as means of coordinating and motivating employees. †¢ Identify the main behavior controls, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages as means of coordinating and motivating employees. †¢ Discuss the relationship between organizational control and change, and explain why managing changeRead MoreAdding Value to the Organization1071 Words   |  5 Pagesthe shift of the industrial age to the information age came a new era of managers that need to be in tune with what is happening in the organization and what is happening on the management levels. HR’s are sought after as the professionals that can help influence organizational strategies and also they can support top managers in accomplishing their goals. Therefore, the focus of human resource influence on organizational strategy lies in the wise mans words of â€Å"If you don’t know where you areRead MoreOrganizational Effectiveness Essay1264 Words   |  6 PagesOrganizational Effectiveness Benjamin Dunton CJA/474 February 04, 2013 Kenneth Rosa Organizational Effectiveness Every company has a set of goals designed to lead the organization in a specific direction. To achieve these goals, managers should train employees to follow a specific path or set of rules that will lead to organizational effectiveness. The measurement of effectiveness is achieved through completion of the organizations goals. To understand organizational effectivenessRead MoreManagement vs. Leadership Essay989 Words   |  4 Pagesseparate a manager from a leader. Merriam-Webster defines leadership simply as the office or position of a leader, the capacity to lead, or the act or an instance of leading. They also define manager as a person who conducts business or household affairs, a person whose work or profession is management, or a person who directs a teamÂ… However, Merriam and Webster do not define leadership as it should be. A leader must ensure a healthy organizational structure, as does a manager, but thereRead MoreManagerial Tasks Of The Managerial Task13 49 Words   |  6 Pagesfirst part in the managerial task is planning. In this step managers or associates set their objectives and goals to complete for the whole task. Once the goal is set, the team strategizes on the most effective and efficient way to completing the objective. The second step of the managerial task is organizing. Organizing is structuring working relationships so organizational members interact and cooperate to achieve organizational goals. Each department has a specific role to play in a cooperationRead MoreManagerial Effectiveness: A Concise Definition803 Words   |  3 Pagesmanagerial effectiveness can be taken to be the achievement of the desired organizational goals, results as well as objectives by taping on the unique abilities of the management. Indeed, as Certo Certo (2006) note, managerial effectiveness has largely got to do with the accomplishment of the prevailing organizational goals through the utilization of available organizational resources. Hence the effectiveness of managers is largely based on how well they utilize the resources of any given organizationRead MoreHow Performance Management Systems Are Used For Dual Purposes1286 Words   |  6 PagesPerformance management is the systematic process by which an agency i nvolves its employees, as individuals and members of a group, in improving organizational effectiveness in the accomplishment of agency mission and goals. Performance Management is the means through which managers ensure that employees activities and outputs are congruent with the organization s goals. According to Aubrey Daniels, often called the â€Å"father of performance management† and the originator of the term, performance management

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

How the Government supports e-business free essay sample

The government and the European Union (EU) advice different businesses to help them to compete with other business online. Small businesses will find it hard to compete with the bigger business as they are not as recognised. The government and the EU will help and advise them to promote themselves so that they are able to grow as a business. Furthermore, by advising smaller businesses to grow, they are creating more jobs. As the smaller businesses expand, they will require more employees. Therefore, the will be less people looking for jobs as more business are looking to employ people. In addition, the government and the EU also train people to use e-business. Most large businesses use e-business to promote their products. The government and the EU help smaller businesses on e-business and help promote them in order to compete against other business. Funding The government offer grants to people in order for them to start a business. We will write a custom essay sample on How the Government supports e-business or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page However, they will have to follow a certain criteria that the government set them. Government grants are non-repayable funds set by the government in order for them to start their own business. By setting a grant, entrepreneurs are able to start their own business whether it is online or store. In addition, the government offers free training and advice to U. K businesses. By offering advice and training, the government are helping to grow small businesses in order for them to gain more of a profit. By funding smaller or new business, you are helping them to start up a business which will help create more employment. Legislation The EU and the U. K government introduced laws to manage e-business such as the copy right law. This will help to protect business from other businesses or individuals from using the same idea as them. Business will normally put copy right on the product; picture etc to indicate to individuals that the products are theirs. The laws are there to protect business from anyone else from taking their ideas. If an individual or businesses are found to have copied another businesses idea, then they could be taken to court as it is illegal to do this. Furthermore, there are also laws with keeping customers details for a certain period of time. Businesses will allow keeping customers details for a certain amount of time. Therefore, the laws are there to protect business from their ideas being used by other businesses or individuals. Conclusion In conclusion, there are different laws to protect different businesses for e-business that the government and the EU have set. In addition, the EU and the government also offer help and advice to small business in order to help them improve and grow.

Saturday, April 11, 2020

Paradise lost Essays (332 words) - Christian Poetry, John Milton

Paradise lost Written at a time of personal and political crisis in Milton's career (1658-65), Paradise Lost is the greatest epic poem in English literature. It had an immense influence on the English Romantics and, through them, on modern poetry. Paradise Lost is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton. It was originally published in 1667 in ten books, with a total of over ten thousand individual lines of verse. A second edition followed in 1674, changed into twelve books (in the manner of the division of Virgils Aeneid) with minor revisions throughout and a note on the versification. The poem concerns the Biblical story of the Fall of Man: the temptation of Adam and Eve by the fallen angel Satan and their expulsion from the Garden of Eden. Originally published in 1667 in ten books, Paradise Lost is an epic poem in blank verse written by John Milton; it was republished in 1674 after being divided into twelve books. Milton has presented his version of the disobedience and subsequent expulsion of man from the Garden of Eden. It is an attempt to understand the heavenly proceedings and to comprehend the conflict between God's decrees and free will. Incarnating theological issues in his work, Milton has created a masterpiece. Paradise Lost is not merely the masterpiece of John Milton (1608-74) but a turning point in style and form, which had a profound influence on the poetry of the following century. Divided into two parts, this major survey begins by discussing the revolutionary characteristics of Paradise Lost in the context of contemporary literary norms and examines the theological, psychological, stylistic and narrative innovation in the poem. It then provides a fuller account of the complex, and now obscure political, and theological issues and other issues that Milton's poem addresses and sought to resolve. It concludes by examining the themes discussed in the light of the influence of the poem on the tradition of English literature.

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Free Essays on Ludwig Van Beetoven

Beethoven was born in Bonn. His father’s harsh discipline and alcoholism made his childhood and adolescence difficult. At the age of 18, after his mother’s death, Beethoven placed himself at the head of the family, taking responsibility for his two younger brothers, both of whom followed him when he later moved to Vienna, Austria. Beethoven’s music is generally divided into three main creative periods. The first, or early, period extends to about 1802, when the composer made reference to a â€Å"new manner† or â€Å"new way† in connection with his art. The second, or middle, period extends to about 1812, after the completion of his Seventh and Eighth symphonies. The third, or late, period emerged gradually; Beethoven composed its pivotal work, the Hammerklavier Sonata, in 1818. Beethoven’s late style is especially innovative, and his last five quartets, written between 1824 and 1826, can be regarded as marking the onset of a fourth creative period. The celebrated Symphony No. 5 in C minor op. 67 from 1808 is the most thematically concentrated of Beethoven’s works. Variants of the four-note motif that begins this symphony drive all four movements. The dramatic turning point in the symphony-where a sense of foreboding, struggle, or mystery yields to a triumphant breakthrough-comes at the transition to the final movement, where the entrance of the trombones reinforces the music. Beethoven uses here a large-scale polarity between the darker sound of C minor and the brighter, more radiant effect of C major, which is held largely in reserve until the finale. The series of gigantic masterpieces of Beethoven’s third period include the technically demanding Hammerklavier Sonata, completed in 1818, about which he correctly predicted on account of its challenges that â€Å"it will be played fifty years hence,† and the Diabelli Variations. The latter work for piano transforms a trivial waltz by Viennese publ isher Anton Diabelli into an ... Free Essays on Ludwig Van Beetoven Free Essays on Ludwig Van Beetoven Beethoven was born in Bonn. His father’s harsh discipline and alcoholism made his childhood and adolescence difficult. At the age of 18, after his mother’s death, Beethoven placed himself at the head of the family, taking responsibility for his two younger brothers, both of whom followed him when he later moved to Vienna, Austria. Beethoven’s music is generally divided into three main creative periods. The first, or early, period extends to about 1802, when the composer made reference to a â€Å"new manner† or â€Å"new way† in connection with his art. The second, or middle, period extends to about 1812, after the completion of his Seventh and Eighth symphonies. The third, or late, period emerged gradually; Beethoven composed its pivotal work, the Hammerklavier Sonata, in 1818. Beethoven’s late style is especially innovative, and his last five quartets, written between 1824 and 1826, can be regarded as marking the onset of a fourth creative period. The celebrated Symphony No. 5 in C minor op. 67 from 1808 is the most thematically concentrated of Beethoven’s works. Variants of the four-note motif that begins this symphony drive all four movements. The dramatic turning point in the symphony-where a sense of foreboding, struggle, or mystery yields to a triumphant breakthrough-comes at the transition to the final movement, where the entrance of the trombones reinforces the music. Beethoven uses here a large-scale polarity between the darker sound of C minor and the brighter, more radiant effect of C major, which is held largely in reserve until the finale. The series of gigantic masterpieces of Beethoven’s third period include the technically demanding Hammerklavier Sonata, completed in 1818, about which he correctly predicted on account of its challenges that â€Å"it will be played fifty years hence,† and the Diabelli Variations. The latter work for piano transforms a trivial waltz by Viennese publ isher Anton Diabelli into an ...

Saturday, February 22, 2020

World literature Eng 225 Coursework Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

World literature Eng 225 Coursework - Essay Example Aeneas was the hero of an oral epic, whereas Roland was the hero of a chansons de geste. The use of medias res in â€Å"The Aeneid† and â€Å"The Iliad† is evident when each story starts in the middle, using flashbacks to fill the reader in on earlier events. For example, â€Å"The Aeneid† begins after the Trojan War, when the Trojan fleet was heading toward Italy. â€Å"The Iliad† is similar by beginning nine years into the Trojan War. The use of medias res in both text foreshadow the end results. In â€Å"The Aeneid† the defeated Trojan fleet heading to Italy shows that the Trojans lost the war. Homer begins the â€Å"The Iliad† with Agamemnon taking Briseis, Achilles’ slave girl, setting up the battle that rages through out the epic between Agamemnon and Achilles. â€Å"The Song of Roland† also uses medias res by starting in the middle. Even though it does not seem to start in the middle by starting with Seven Years in Spain, yet to a medieval audience it would be in the middle of the Saracens battle with